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National CrossTalk Fall 1999
News Editorial Other Voices Interview
  In This Issue
 
Kath Robinson is regional coordinator for partnership schools at UC Santa Cruz, which has launched an ambitious outreach program to generate interest in higher education among K-12 students in predominantly low-income, minority schools. The University of California is spending more than $150 million annually on such programs. (See After Affirmative Action)

News
Revamping Remedial Education
City University of New York grapples with a complex web of issues surrounding programs for underprepared students

The Scary Cost of College
Public concerns remain about the escalating expense of higher education

News From the Center

After Affirmative Action
Educational outreach programs help minority students onto the college track

Indiana's New Community College Plan
A state- mandated partnership between Ivy Tech and Vincennes University is seen by some as a shotgun marriage

Interview
Alexander W. Austin
Alexander W. Astin is director of the Higher Education Research Institute and Allan M. Cartter professor of higher education at UCLA. He is nationally known for annual polling of freshmen over the past 34 years, revealing that youthful goals have changed strikingly: Saving the world has become less important to them than getting ahead in business.

Other Voices
Doing Comparatively Well
Why the public loves higher education and criticizes K-12
  An instructor at John Jay College, one of the City University of New York's senior colleges, helps students prepare for CUNY's new admissions examinations.
  An instructor at John Jay College, one of the City University of New York's senior colleges, helps students prepare for CUNY's new admissions examinations.
NEW YORK

THE SQUAT GRAY central administration building of the City University of New York is wrapped in a giant blue wooden scaffolding topped with barbed wire, awaiting renovation. It's an irresistible metaphor for a system undergoing a dramatic reconstruction of its own.

Beginning this semester, CUNY, the nation's largest urban university and the third-largest public university of any kind in the United States, began to exclude students from its bachelor's degree programs who could not demonstrate that they are ready to begin college-level work in math and English. And, for the first time in three decades, applicants to the system's four-year universities will have to meet minimum scores on national standarized tests....(continue)
 
 
   
Jamie Pueschel, legislative director for the United States Student Association, displays a $150 billion check, representing money students have borrowed to pay for college.  
Jamie Pueschel, legislative director for the United States Student Association, displays a $150 billion check, representing money students have borrowed to pay for college.  
WASHINGTON

TWO YEARS AFTER a national commission reported on the escalating cost of attending college, the report has been largely forgotten, but a booming national economy, and growing sensitivity to charges of price gouging, have led to smaller annual tuition and fee increases at both public and private colleges and universities.

The soaring stock market has inflated the endowments of many private (and some public) schools, making large price increases less necessary and also making them harder to justify. At the same time, unexpectedly high tax revenues have enabled most states to spend more on higher education; a few have frozen or even reduced tuition and fees at public colleges....(continue)
 
     

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