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National CrossTalk Fall 1999
News Editorial Other Voices Interview

After the Attacks
Traditionally liberal Macalester College wrestles with its conscience
 
 

  In This Issue
 

We’ve made an institutional commitment that our distance programs will be of the same quality as those delivered on campus,” says Muriel K. Oaks, dean of extended university services at Washington State University.(continue )

News
After the Attacks
Traditionally liberal Macalester College wrestles with its conscience>

Kentucky's Moderate Spending Cuts
Reduced higher education funding may jeopardize recent reforms

Measuring Student Performance
Government, business and higher education leaders attend a "National Forum on College-Level Learning"

News From The Center

Life Goes On at Los Alamos
National lab focuses on new projects after two difficult years

Distance Learning
Online education has become "part of the landscape"

Conservative Tabloid Targets City College
Did the CUNY chancellor allow the New York Post to set his agenda?

Other Voices
It Could Have Been Much Worse
How the terrorist attacks have impacted the academic community

Who Is Leading?
College presidents and higher education policy

Picking the Perfect Freshman Class
Balancing the academic and nonacademic goals of admissions policy

 
  Macalester College official Terry K. Gorman raises the American and United Nations flags, both of which fly on the St. Paul, Minnesota, campus. UN Secretary- General Kofi Annan is a Macalester graduate.
By Kathy Witkowsky
ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA


Last fall, as a favor to a journalist looking for a September 11 follow-up story, Macalester College history professor Emily Rosenberg asked students in her U.S.Foreign Policy in the 20th Century class how they felt about being at the forefront of a new, post- September 11 generation. The students gave a collective groan, she recalled.
“That whole question,” one of them said,“ignores history.” (continue)
 

Kentucky’s Moderate Spending Cuts
Reduced higher education funding may jeopardize recent reforms

 
   
 
Greg Gerhardt, a professor of anatomy and neurobiology, and a leading Parkinson’s Disease researcher, was lured to the University of Kentucky with “Bucks for Brains” money.  
By William Trombley
Senior Editor
FRANKFORT,KENTUCKY


These have been the days of wine and roses,” said James Votruba, president of Northern Kentucky University, referring to the last five years, when the state’s public colleges and universities have received strong support from the governor and the legislature. “There was plenty of money and we were encouraged to do new things—what more could a university president want?”Votruba asked.
Democratic Governor Paul Patton came into office in 1995 declaring that reform in postsecondary education would be his “number one priority,” and he has kept that promise. (continue)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
     

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