Front Page
     
  Current Issue
     
  Back Issues
 
  Searchable
CrossTalk
Index
 
  Download
 
  Subscribe
 
  About National CrossTalk

National CrossTalk Fall 1999
News Editorial Other Voices Interview

An Unknown Quantity
Olin College students, faculty and administrators create an innovative new university from scratch
 
 

  In This Issue
 

Daniel Habuki is president of Soka University, a new Buddhist liberal arts college in Orange County, California, with a $245 million campus and a $300 million endowment. (continue )

News
An Unknown Quantity
Olin College students, faculty and administrators create an innovative new university from scratch

Pushing Advanced Placement
California hopes to include more minority students

Editorial: Losing Ground
Tuition increases outpace family income

Harsh Realities
A national report on the affordability of higher education

The World's Community College
Diversity in action at LaGuardia

Soka University
Can a tiny Buddhist college succeed in the competitive world of private higher education?

Other Voices
What's in a Name?
"Politically correct" language continues to spark debate on and off campus



 
  Olin College's first buildings rise behind college President Richard Miller (second from left) and students Susan Fredholm, Matt Hill and Julianna Connelly.
By Jon Marcus
NEEDHAM, MASSACHUSETTS


The students mingle shyly, carefully turned out to look as if they don't care how they look. Their parents, anxious to appear as if they aren't watching, stare like hawks. The administrators smile and make speeches in the shade of a yellow-and-white-striped tent, where there is a buffet with tofu burgers for the vegetarians. "This is the first day of an extraordinary journey," one reads from his notes. It is, in short, a typical opening of the academic year at a small New England college.

But this particular small college is far from typical, and these are not typical students, and this is not just another (continue)

 

Pushing Advanced Placement
California hopes to include more minority students

 
   
 
Advanced Placement classes at Mojave, California, High School have helped senior Veronica Gomez gain admission to several top California campuses.  
By Kay Mills
MOJAVE, CALIFORNIA


Veronica Gomez hated reading, she says, but "started to like it" because of the Advanced Placement literature and composition class that she is taking as a senior at Mojave High School. She explains that reading was hard for her because she didn't understand why writers were saying what they were saying. The AP class guides her through Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night," Charlotte Bronte's "Jane Eyre," and Zora Neale Hurston's "Their Eyes Were Watching God," her favorite. This is only the second year that her school has offered AP English.

Mojave, with 500 students in a small, wind-swept town in the high desert northeast of Los Angeles, and Gomez, the daughter of Mexican immigrants who work in local fast food (continue)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
     

National Center logo
© 2000 The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education

HOME | about us | center news | reports & papers | national crosstalk | search | links | contact

site managed by NETView Communications