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News Editorial Other Voices Interview

Has the State Become an Albatross
Some of Virginia's public universities are seeking greater freedom to set tuition

  In This Issue
 


(Photo by Jake Schoellkoff, Black Star, for CrossTalk)

The Graduation Project at the University of New Mexico has helped more than 1,000 dropouts like Arellana Cordero return to campus and earn bachelor's degrees.
( more)

News
Has the State Become an Albatross
Some of Virginia's public universities are seeking greater freedom to set tuition

Application Madness
For many parents, the college admissions process leads to panic

Bringing "Dropouts" Back to College
The University of New Mexico's Graduation Project is the first of its kind among the nation's public universities

New Campus Still Faces Obstacles
After being postponed for a year, UC Merced hopes to open in fall 2005

News From The Center

Interview
David L. Kirp

Other Voices
Two Faces of the College Board
The drive for financial success now dominates its current direction

Demanding More from High School Students
Business-led "State Scholars Initiative" connects the classroom to the workplace


   
 
By Pamela Burdman
Williamsburg, Virginia

The year was 1906, and the second-oldest college in America was in a shaky state. The College of William and Mary had been badly ravaged during the Civil War-physically by the military units that had occupied the campus' main building and financially by the Board of Visitors' decision to invest part of the endowment in Confederate bonds.

The school's president managed to keep the campus open for some 12 years only by reaching into his own pocket, but in 1881, the campus was shuttered. It re-opened in 1888 when the commonwealth of Virginia stepped in to fund a teacher education program at the school. But by 1906, increasingly dependent on the state's subsidy, the board agreed to transfer the school to state control.

  
Virginia's public colleges and universities would benefit from a $1 billion tax increase proposed by Governor Mark Warner, a Democrat.
(Photo by Dennis Brack, Black Star, for CrossTalk)

"They were after a more stable funding source," said William and Mary economics professor Robert Archibald.
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Application Madness
For many parents, the college admissions process leads to panic

 
   
By Anne C. Roark

I knew we were in trouble when I started rearranging the furniture in our family room.

At first, the changes were inconsequential-a couch pushed aside, a library table installed in front of the television. But then things grew more complicated. I dragged in a round table from the garden, and chairs from the kitchen, and scavenged a bunker-sized bulletin board from my office. We needed a place to post deadlines, keep track of names, and record other intelligence gathered.

Prospective college students are deluged with booklets, brochures and guidebooks; some run to 600 pages or more.
(Photo by Todd Sallo, for CrossTalk)

The mail had already begun to pile up, sending me on a frantic search for storage files. I improvised with a set of large wooden crates, which my friend Gracie had left in my care after her fiancÚ found out they were a gift from one of her old boyfriends.
(continue)

 
     

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