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News Editorial Other Voices Interview

Debating Student Debt
Are college students living beyond their means?

  In This Issue
 

Students line up for shuttle buses at the Chicago campus of the University of Illinois. Bus service was reduced after the campus budget was cut by $38 million. This issue looks at the impact of higher education budget cuts in three states-Virginia, Illinois and Washington.

News
Debating Student Debt
Are college students living beyond their means?

Virginia's Latest Budget Squeeze
Years of tax cuts lead to higher tuition, fewer student services

Hard Times for Illinois
Slow economy leads to budget cuts and tuition hikes

Washington's Fiscal Storm
Political and economic tides have converged against public higher education

News From The Center

Letters to the Editor

Policy Perspectives
   A Special Supplement
   to National Crosstalk

   (PDF file 2MB download)

Other Voices
Creating a Strategic Vision
Observations about statewide higher education planning and

"Non-need" Grants
The merits-and demerits-of state merit aid programs

A bad idea whose time has come?


   
 
By Kathy Witkowsky
MISSOULA, MONTANA



Christina Adams is an accounting major at the University of Montana, where she has earned a 4.0 grade point average. She's proud of her excellent grades, and excited that, come May, she'll become the first person in her immediate family to graduate from college. Those grades, though, have cost her, and she knows they will continue to exact a price in the future-though she has absolutely no idea how much of one.

Afraid that a job would interfere with her academic performance, Adams, 23, has relied heavily on loans to finance three years of her education at UM, where annual in-state tuition and fees for incoming freshmen runs $4,033, and where a scholarship allows Adams, who does not have residency status, to pay 150 percent of in-state charges rather than out-of-state tuition. (Her parents picked up the tab for her first year of college, at Arizona State University.)

But until recently, when a reporter inquired about her situation, Adams had never crunched the numbers.

"I'm not managing my money very well right now," Adams acknowledged with a nervous laugh. "It's just easier for me not to know the totals."   (continue)

 

Virginia's Latest Budget Squeeze
Years of tax cuts lead to higher tuition, fewer student services

 
   
By Carl Irving
RICHMOND, VIRGINIA


Virginia's 15 public degree-granting colleges and universities and 23 community colleges have been hammered by the recession, following a dozen years of state policy decisions that sharply reduced financial support for the University of Virginia, the state's flagship campus.

This last budget squeeze will have dire long-term consequences, officials and educators here in the state capital and at several campuses predict. They blame a political fixation on lowering taxes, freezing and then sharply lowering tuition, and failure to accumulate a surplus during good economic times.   (continue)

 
     

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