THE PUBLIC SUPPORTS MEASURES TO DECREASE COSTS WITHOUT HARMING ACCESS OR QUALITY


The situation is clearly not at a crisis point in the publicís mind. The public is still much more concerned about KĖ12 than about higher education. However, although people have clearly not thought much about higher education, they do have some thoughts about policy measures. Generally, the public favors measures that will decrease costs without harming either access or quality. One popular approach is to encourage a greater use of community colleges, which people believe do just as good a job for less money (see Figure 17; also see Figure 18).

The public also responds positively to the idea of students doing more college work in high school. People believe that a student can learn just as much in a college-level course taught in a high school (see Figure 19).

Other cost saving measures such as distance education and evening or weekend classes are also seen as a positive, with one caveat: While people support Internet courses for adults, they are less supportive of them for traditional-age students.

Finally, Americans tend to resist anything that they see as decreasing the quality of higher education or limiting access to it. Nearly two-thirds reject the idea of reducing the number of courses required for a degree, or of consolidating programs by closing regional campuses (see Figure 20).

 


More


site managed by NETView Communications