Preface
 
Introduction
 
The New Federal Tuition Tax
 
Description of State Policy Alternatives
 
Recommendations
 
Conclusion
 
Appendix
 
Endnotes
 
Selected Bibliography
 
About the National Center
 
State-by-State Data

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Federal Tuition Tax Credits
Page 7 of 10

Appendix: Tables

Table 2
Notes: U.S. Department of Education estimates based on state-level enrollment, Pell grant recipient data, national averages of tuition and fees, and the President's fiscal year 1998 budget policy, adjusted for mid-season review re-estimates. Because the department's estimates are based on the 1995÷96 national average for tuition and fees for each segment, there are some states for which the estimates are not precise. For example, estimates for California are overstated because 60% of its students are enrolled in public two-year colleges, in which tuition and fees were $900 less than the national average for that academic year. This policy brief recommends that states conduct their own analyses using state-specific, current data (and IRS data when they are available) to develop precise estimates of how citizens are benefiting from the federal tax credits. Totals may not add exactly due to rounding.
Source: U.S. Department of Education, Digest of Education Statistics, 1997, Table 193.

Table 2
Notes: U.S. Department of Education estimates based on state-level enrollment, Pell grant recipient data, national averages of tuition and fees, and the President's fiscal year 1998 budget policy, adjusted for mid-season review re-estimates. Because the department's estimates are based on the 1995÷96 national average for tuition and fees for each segment, there are some states for which the estimates are not precise. For example, estimates for California are overstated because 60% of its students are enrolled in public two-year colleges, in which tuition and fees were $900 less than the national average for that academic year. This policy brief recommends that states conduct their own analyses using state-specific, current data (and IRS data when they are available) to develop precise estimates of how citizens are benefiting from the federal tax credits. Totals may not add exactly due to rounding.
Source: U.S. Department of Education, Digest of Education Statistics, 1997, Table 193.

Note: Calculations are for full-time freshmen. Income is defined as adjusted gross income for taxpayers filing jointly with two dependents. Pell grants are for families of four with one child in college. Loan subsidy is based on the maximum subsidized loan for freshmen, $2,625. Eligibility for tax credit is determined by tuition less all grants, scholarships, and other tax-free educational assistance. Tax credit is $0 if family income is less than $30,000 or net tuition is negative. Maximum allowable tax credit is $1,250 for two-year colleges and $1,500 for four-year colleges.
Source: The Brookings Institution.

Table 5
Note: Calculations are for full-time freshmen. Taxable family income is defined as adjusted gross income for taxpayer filing jointly with two dependents. Pell grants are for families of four with one child in college. Loan subsidy is based on the maximum subsidized loan for freshmen, $2,625. Eligibility for tax credit is determined by tuition less all grants, scholarships, and other tax-free educational assistance. Tax credit is $0 if family income is less than $30,000 or net tuition is negative. Maximum allowable tax credit is $1,250 for two-year colleges and $1,500 for four-year colleges. Cost of attendance equals tuition, required fees, and room and board--minus scholarships, grants, and other tax-free educational assistance received by the student.
Source: The Brookings Institution.

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